Monthly Archives: May 2014

My Struggle, by Karl Ove Knausgaard

Most critics attempt to demonstrate a novelist’s perceptiveness by providing examples of his eye for the significant detail. But part of what makes Knausgaard’s writing unusual is that he seems barely to adjudicate significance; he’s like a child who has…

Jean-Luc Godard; Goodbye to Language

Cannes 2014 At 83, Godard has lived long enough to see his ideas and procedures migrate to conceptual art and video art, leaving him alone in the cinema. Yet his energy and intensity and difficulty are eerily undiminished….. The Guardian…

Der Rosenkavalier at Glyndebourne

In all its minute details, Der Rosenkavalier is rooted in a painstakingly stylised version of Rococo Vienna that, paradoxically, is further fixed in a web of cannily juxtaposed anachronisms. Upset their balance and you risk upsetting the balance of the…

Delphi

We use the word ‘delphic’ to mean riddling, ambiguous, difficult to parse. It applies just as much to the history of Ancient Greece’s most sacred site as it does to the pronouncements of its oracle….. The Spectator

Bill Viola in St Paul’s Cathedral

Bill Viola’s Martyrs, St Paul’s Cathedral – exhibition preview Martyrs, unveiled on Thu May 22, is the first of video artist Bill Viola’s two-part permanent installation in St Paul’s Cathedral. It recalls torture as much as redemption, says Ben Luke,…

Kennneth Clark and Civilization

Kenneth Clarke: Tate Britain By the skin of our teeth. Civilisation, Kenneth Clark’s 1969 TV series for the BBC still sets the high-water mark for art programming. Clark’s steady scholarship, vast subject knowledge, and unsensationalist enthusiasm delivered the corpus of…

Women pop artists

It’s clear that female artists of the ’60s were pushed to the margins of art history. But a series of exhibitions showcasing their work reveals how un-Pop many of them were. Western art history has nearly always been constructed as…