Monthly Archives: September 2014

Walter Benjamin

Fallen Angel The tragic life and enduring influence of critic Walter Benjamin Ian Penman Benjamin’s reputation has soared since his death in 1940. Nearly 75 years ago, at the outset of World War Two, stranded between official borderlines, right on…

Are today’s intellectuals are too obedient?

The Responsibility of Intellectuals, Noam Chomsky’s classic essay, is now approaching its 50th anniversary. His mighty polemic was written as his country, the US, moved deeper and deeper into national and international crisis. The tonnage of high explosive dropped on…

The New Luddites

The new Luddites: why former digital prophets are turning against tech Neo-Luddism began to emerge in the postwar period. First after the emergence of nuclear weapons, and secondly when it became apparent new computer technologies had the power to change…

Smartphones and Spatial Thinking

Navigation apps are transforming the way we experience urban environments—for better and for worse. Like most New Yorkers, I spend an inordinate amount of time in transit. I have an unlimited Metrocard and a Citi Bike key, two bicycles and…

Overcrowded museums

Is It Time To Break Up Overcrowded Museums? September 4, 2014 by Judith H. Dobrzynski Hrag Vartanian, whom you may know as the editor-in-chief and co-founder of Hyperallergic, had a very interesting opinion piece published on Al Jazeera America the…

The Kinshasa Symphony Orchestra

Despite being ravaged by war and poverty, the Democratic Republic of Congo has produced the world’s first all-black symphony orchestra, which has grown from a small group with home-made instruments to a respected international outfit. A day after arriving in…